Interventions

Working on:

  • Consistent looking at a small set of objects 
  • Examples may be: pinwheel, familiar character (ex. Elmo), windsock, slinky, single colored spoon, etc.
  • Items can be used as part of a daily activity (ex. show the red spoon before using it to eat)
  • Can teach phonemic awareness and alphabet with auditory scanning- student will not be able to see or understand the visual letter, can use objects as anchors (ex. A for apple)

Guidelines for presenting items:

  • Use objects of a single, preferred color
  • Use objects that are shiny or reflective
  • Use a simple background (black or white)
  • Use objects that are familiar
  • Use of movement to gain and sustain attention
  • Presented in strongest field (usually peripheral)
  • Present objects on a light box or use a flashlight to cast light onto the item (make sure the flashlight is held from behind the child)
  • May be able to regard simple moving images on an iPad
  • Decreased background noise
  • Seated away from light sources
  • Materials present within 18 inches or less
  • Provide ample wait time, provide verbal prompt prior to presentation and then silently wait for visual attention, sometimes up to 30 seconds

Next steps...

  • Teach salient features of familiar objects (ex. what makes a spoon a spoon-see salient features books under the Adapted Books tab)
  • Add more objects
  • Add objects of another color
  • Try increasing the complexity of objects (ex. 2 colored objects)
  • Show similar objects to familiar objects (ex. other types of spoons) and talk about what makes them similar and different
  • Have students identify or select a requested object out of the group of preferred objects “Which one is your spoon?” 
  • Work on discrimination activities “Show me an object (spoon) like the one I am holding.” 
  • Work on recognition activities “Look at these objects and find the spoon” 
  • Work on identification activities (pairing with auditory scanning if needed) “What is this called?” 
  • With this specific instruction and practice, an individual with CVI will eventually learn to generalize visual information

More example activities

More example activities

Working On:

  • Starting to introduce 2-d materials using photos of familiar favorite objects
  • Continue to teach salient features, now with photos of familiar objects
  • Work on discrimination activities with photos “Show me an object (spoon) like the one I am holding.” 
  • Work on recognition activities with photos “Look at these objects and find the spoon” 
  • Work on identification activities with photos (pairing with auditory scanning if needed) “What is this called?” 
  • Continue teaching phonemic awareness and alphabet with auditory scanning- student will not be able to see or understand the visual letter until later in Phase II, can use objects and now photos as anchors (A for apple) 
  • Note: Visual attention does not guarantee understanding

Guidelines for presenting items:

  • Use objects of a gradually increasing complexity
  • May still need preferred color as part of the object 
  • May be able to use more complex backgrounds with familiar objects
  • Use a simple background (black or white) with new items/photos
  • Use of their favorite color for highlighting of salient features and word bubbling
  • Movement may still be needed to gain attention
  • Presented in strongest field, may be able to present more centrally
  • It may still be difficult to see items exactly at mid-line, off set slightly to one side
  • Present new objects on a light box or use a flashlight to cast light onto the item (make sure the flashlight is held from behind the child)
  • Use of a iPad or light box to present 2-d images
  • May still need slightly decreased background noise
  • Seated away from light sources
  • May be able to regard movement from further away 
  • Wait time may still be needed when individual is ill, tired, or stressed

Working On:

  • Continued refinement of CVI characteristics 
  • It is very unlikely to reach a score of 9-10, **some characteristics may remain life-long
  • Provide instruction in phonemic awareness of letters and sounds, now with letters using bubbling around the letters, can use objects and photos as anchors (A for apple) 
  • Photos are still the easiest to perceive, but can start to introduce images like those used in a AAC device **images will need to be taught for understanding
  • Teach salient features of letters, numbers, picture symbols, and/or whole words, with preferred color highlighting 
  • Work on discrimination activities with letters, numbers, picture symbols, whole words “Show me one like ___” 
  • Work on recognition activities with letters, numbers, pictures symbols, whole words “Show me the ___” 
  • Work on identification activities with letters, numbers, pictures symbols, whole words (pairing with auditory scanning if needed) “What is this called?” 
  • Matching printed word, number, or letter to the empty color outline shape of the word, number, or letter

Guidelines for presenting items:

  • Use objects of a gradually increasing complexity
  • May be able to use more complex backgrounds with less complex objects
  • Use a simple background (black or white) with new items/images
  • Use of their favorite color for highlighting of salient features and word bubbling for new words
  • Movement may occasionally be needed to gain attention
  • It may still be difficult to see items exactly at mid-line, off set slightly to one side
  • Use of a iPad or light box may still help support attention
  • May still need slightly decreased background noise, especially for complex or difficult activities
  • Seated away from light sources
  • Wait time may still be needed when individual is ill, tired, or stressed
  • May be able to regard a non-moving target up to 10 feet and moving targets up to 20 feet

ADA & Accessibility

Our School Strives To Ensure Our Website Is Accessible To All Our Visitors 

Washtenaw ISD is committed to providing a website that is fully accessible and we are currently in the process of developing a new website to better meet the needs of our customers. Our new website will include improvements to ADA compliance and accessibility, and during this transition, we remain committed to maintaining our existing website's accessibility and usability. 

ADA Compliance

Non Discrimination

It is the policy and commitment of the Washtenaw Intermediate School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, age, height, weight, familial status, marital status, genetic information, sexual orientation or any legally protected characteristic, in its educational programs, activities, admissions, or employment policies in accordance with Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments, executive order 11246 as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and all other pertinent state and Federal regulations.

Non Discrimination Information

Title IX Coordinator ADA and Title IX Coordinator
Brian Marcel
Associate Superintendent
1819 S. Wagner Road 
Ann Arbor, MI  48103
(734) 994-8100 ext. 1402
Cassandra Harmon-Higgins
Executive Director, HR & Legal Services
1819 S. Wagner Road 
Ann Arbor, MI  48103
(734) 994-8100 ext. 1311