Kitchen Daily Living Skills

Including your child in your daily cooking routines will allow them to develop independence and self-confidence.   

Today we are going to share a You Tube Video created by a Michigan Teacher for the Visually Impaired, Anne Zanger.  

We encourage you to watch the 3 min. video below and then do the activity listed below with your child. 

Adaptive Kitchen Equipment with Anne Zanger

Activity:

Talk to your child about the various kitchen tools mentioned in the video. 

  • Marking kitchen appliances (start button on Microwave, toaster start button, etc.) with color (colored stickers, colored masking tape) or something tactile. (wikki sticks, bump/raised stickers, hot glue, puffy paint, etc.). 
  • Measuring Cups (large print, colored, braille)
  • Measuring Spoons (large print, colored, braille)
  • Vegetable Peeler
  • Spreader Knife
  • Liquid Level Indicator

Where are they located in your kitchen?  Is your child able to use them, or should they be adapted in some way?

When cooking your next meal, pick one or two of the kitchen tools and encourage your child to use them to help prepare your meal.

Search, with your child, one of the websites listed below and look for adaptive kitchen equipment that might be useful at your home.

Watch the Video below.

Teaching Pouring with Michele and Heather: Pouring Cold Liquids for the Visually Impaired

Activity

Practice pouring from different containers.

  • Encourage your child to gather all of the ingredients and kitchen tools that they will need. Talk about where the milk, juice, water, etc is stored. Practice opening and closing each container. 
  • Talk about the different sized containers and practice pouring from that container the liquid comes in. If it is too heavy, such as a gallon of milk, you can pour it in a manageable container. It can be a small water bottle with a lid, a smaller serving container with a pour spout, etc.

When pouring it is helpful, especially if you cannot see the liquid nearing the top of the cup to place the index finger on the rim of the cup or bowl and curl it so it is just inside the near the top. When the liquid is poured and it reaches your finger you stop pouring. This prevents spilling.

It is helpful to store all their containers in the fridge low so they can grab them independently. It is also helpful, if possible to allow your child to have their own drawer or cupboard with cups, bowls, etc. This helps prompt independence. 

Send a picture or video to your Teacher for the Visually Impaired or Orientation and Mobility Specialist!

Watch the Video Activity:

Teaching Spreading with Michele and Heather: Spreading Techniques for the Visually Impaired

Activity

Practice Making a Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich

  • Encourage your child to gather all of the ingredients and kitchen tools that they will need.  Talk about where the bread and  peanut butter are stored and where the jelly is stored.  Practice opening and closing each container.
  • Talk about the different types of knives that you have in the kitchen.  A butter knife is good for spreading because it has a wider flat surface and it has smooth edges.  A dinner knife has a thinner surface and sharper edge that can be useful for cutting. 
  • You can use different nut butters just in case you have any allergies. If you do not want peanut butter and jelly, you are welcome to practice with mayo or mustard on a meat or veggie sandwich. 
    • Try spreading butter or jelly on toast instead.
    • Try spreading Ketchup & Mustard on a burger bun or hot dog bun.
    • Try spreading a soft cheese onto a cracker. 

Send a picture or video to your Teacher for the Visually Impaired or Orientation and Mobility Specialist!

Watch the Video below.

Teaching Slicing with Michele and Heather: Cutting and Slicing Practice for the Visually Impaired

Activity

Talk about different tools you will need for slicing. 

  • High contrast cutting board if needed, (you do not want a yellow cutting board when cutting a yellow banana, try a blue or black cutting board). 
  • Sturdy knife that with a slight sharp edge, such as a metal dinner knife or hard plastic knife (not steak knife sharp unless you are beyond the basic cutting skill).

Practice slicing/cutting soft foods first, like a banana, until you feel comfortable moving onto harder foods, such as a cucumber. 

  • Talk with your child about what foods, butter knifes, dinner knives, sharp knives cut. 
  • Encourage your child to gather all of the ingredients and kitchen tools that they will need. Talk about where a banana is stored, a cucumber, a hot dog, etc.  
  • Discuss how soft foods the knife will just slide down and hard foods you may need to do a sawing motion to get through the food. 

Send a picture or video to your Teacher for the Visually Impaired or Orientation and Mobility Specialist!

Time to use the microwave! You will also use your scooping and stirring skills by making a delicious chocolate cake in a cup.

  1. Check out the 15 tips and tricks to help with some ideas while cooking.
  2. Review the recipe to see what ingredients and tools you need. Cake in a Cup 
  3. Collect all of your ingredients and put them on a cookie sheet or container to keep track while cooking.
    • Tip 1: Sometimes it is helpful to put anything that needs to be poured from a bottle into a separate low rimmed container. This will make it easier to scoop with your measuring spoons rather than pouring. It’s more accurate measuring and less spillage. You can then use a funnel to pour the extra ingredients back into the bottle after your done baking.
    • Tip 2: I also cut straws in half and used a different number in each container to identify my ingredients after putting them in containers for scooping. This way I knew the difference between them. I put 3 straws in my oil, 2 straws in my milk and 1 straw in my vanilla. But you can do what makes sense for you.
  4. Collect all of your tools and put them on a cookie sheet or container to keep track while cooking.
  5. Watch the video and follow the verbal and/or the written directions. This is a video of Ms. Michele and her daughter, Heather, making a chocolate cake in a cup. (13 minutes) Making a Cake in a Cup with tips for the visually impaired
  6. Make your cake in a cup.
  7. Enjoy your cake in a cup!
  8. Send a picture or video to your Teacher for the Visually Impaired or Orientation and Mobility Specialist!

ADA & Accessibility

Our School Strives To Ensure Our Website Is Accessible To All Our Visitors 

Washtenaw ISD is committed to providing a website that is fully accessible and we are currently in the process of developing a new website to better meet the needs of our customers. Our new website will include improvements to ADA compliance and accessibility, and during this transition, we remain committed to maintaining our existing website's accessibility and usability. 

ADA Compliance

Non Discrimination

It is the policy and commitment of the Washtenaw Intermediate School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, age, height, weight, familial status, marital status, genetic information, sexual orientation or any legally protected characteristic, in its educational programs, activities, admissions, or employment policies in accordance with Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments, executive order 11246 as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and all other pertinent state and Federal regulations.

Non Discrimination Information

Title IX Coordinator ADA and Title IX Coordinator
Brian Marcel
Associate Superintendent
1819 S. Wagner Road 
Ann Arbor, MI  48103
(734) 994-8100 ext. 1402
Cassandra Harmon-Higgins
Executive Director, HR & Legal Services
1819 S. Wagner Road 
Ann Arbor, MI  48103
(734) 994-8100 ext. 1311